Acupuncture and Remedial Massage Therapy in Melbourne CBD

How safe is “dry needling”?

National registration of the traditional Chinese profession was introduced on 1 July 2012. This is the same type of regulation applying to eg. medical practitioners, nurses, dentists, pharmacists etc. While acupuncture is considered very safe in hands of well- trained practitioners, it has also been associated with a range of complications caused by poorly trained practitioners.

Current trend is 1-2day course for “dry needling” for anyone – registered or not! The most recent Advertisements in Massage therapy journal even run Dry needling course on line! With 12hours of practise!
How would you like to enjoy beeing needled by someone who did online course versus registered practitioner who went to University for 4 years to study Acupuncture…..?

It’s important to be aware that the Health Practitioner National Law Act only allows practitioners registered with the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia (www.chinesemedicineboard.gov.au) to use the title “registered Acupuncturist”. It does not stop anyone offering ” dry needling” services, whether they are registered or not!

How to find registered practitioner?
At www.ahpra.gov.au/Registration/Registers-of-Practitioners.aspx.
At www.acupuncture.org.au

“Extract from official AACMA newsletter”

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Infertility to Pregnancy with Acupuncture &Herbs

“A new clinical study concludes that Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine have potent effects in reversing infertility.”
Extract from Health CMi Healthcare Medicine Institute
www.healthcmi.com

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Chinese Herbal Medicines useful for Vascular Dementia

Extract from AACMA newsletter :
A recent meta-analysis published in “Neural Regeneration Research” combined data from 31 research studies which had previously explored the effects of Chinese herbal Medicine on Vascular Dementia. Vascular Dementia is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease and is associated with problems of circulation of blood to the brain.
A meta-analysis of Chinese herbal medicines for vascular dementia reviewed data concerning 2868 patients, 1605 of whom took Chinese Medicine decoctions and 1263 who took Western medicine or placebo treatment (control group).
It found that patients taking Chinese herbal medicines scored higher on the Mini-Mental State Examination, which is used to screen for cognitive impairment, than those in the control group.
Patients in the treatment group also showed a greater degree of improvement in their condition, with considerably fewer adverse reactions.
Chinese herbal medicine appears to be safer and more effective than control measures in the treatment of vascular dementia, the report concluded.

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